Chopin, Frederic (1810 – 1849)

Chopin was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for the solo piano. He gained and has maintained renown worldwide as a leading musician of his era, whose “poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation.” Chopin was born in what was then the Duchy of Warsaw and grew up in Warsaw, which in 1815 became part of Congress Poland. A child prodigy, he completed his musical education and composed his earlier works in Warsaw before leaving Poland at the age of 20, less than a month before the outbreak of the November 1830 Uprising.

At 21 he settled in Paris. Thereafter, during the last 18 years of his life, he gave only some 30 public performances, preferring the more intimate atmosphere of the salon. He supported himself by selling his compositions and by teaching piano, for which he was in high demand. Chopin formed a friendship with Franz Liszt and was admired by many of his musical contemporaries, including Robert Schumann. In 1835 he obtained French citizenship. After a failed engagement to Maria Wodzińska from 1836 to 1837, he maintained an often troubled relationship with the French writer George Sand. A brief and unhappy visit to Majorca with Sand in 1838–39 was one of his most productive periods of composition. In his last years, he was financially supported by his admirer Jane Stirling, who also arranged for him to visit Scotland in 1848. Through most of his life, Chopin suffered from poor health. He died in Paris in 1849, at the age of 39, probably of tuberculosis.

All of Chopin’s compositions include the piano. Most are for solo piano, though he also wrote two piano concertos, a few chamber pieces, and some songs to Polish lyrics. His keyboard style is highly individual and often technically demanding; his own performances were noted for their nuance and sensitivity. Chopin invented the concept of the instrumental ballade. His major piano works also include mazurkas, waltzes, nocturnes, polonaises, études, impromptus, scherzos, preludes and sonatas, some published only after his death. Influences on his composition style include Polish folk music, the classical tradition of J. S. Bach, Mozart and Schubert, as well as the Paris salons where he was a frequent guest. His innovations in style, musical form, and harmony, and his association of music with nationalism, were influential throughout and after the late Romantic period. (source: Wikipedia)


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Prelude Opus 28, No 15 “Raindrop”
BB BE 120606 – $38.00
4′ 00″ – advanced

arranged by Michael Allen for (423.11) E flat Trumpet, B flat Trumpet, 2 Flugelhorns, 2 Horns, 2 Tenor Trombones, Bass Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba


Prelude Opus 28, No 4
BB BE 121004 – $32.00
2′ 00″ – advanced

According to George Sand’s daughter Solange, who stayed with the composer at the monastery in Majorca when the preludes were written, “My mother gave a title to each of Chopin’s wonderful Preludes; these titles have been preserved on a score he gave to us.” That titled score is lost. But Solange did record the names of the preludes, apparently without assigning the names to the prelude numbers. It is believed that the title “Quelles larmes au fond du cloutre humide?” (“What tears [are shed] from the depths of the damp monastery?”) corresponds to Prelude No. 4.  Lovely.

arranged by Michael Allen for (423.11) Trumpet in C, A Piccolo Trumpet, 2 Flugelhorns, 2 Horns, 2 Tenor Trombones, Bass Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba